The Film Fixer is the specialist film and television production support and local fixer organiser in Myanmar. Terry Gordon of Asia Film Fixers has provided numerous international productions support in Myanmar, with a network stretching across Burma. The film fixer, Terry Gordon, is south east asia's leading film and television fixer, location manager and production support consultant in asia. The Film Fixer, through Asia Film Fixers can provide film permits, production support, logistics, customs clearance, carnet management, transport and accommodation across asia. We work in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar, Turkey, UAE, Indonesia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Singapore and Papua New Guinea. Contact asiafilmfixers.com for a local fixer in asia. The Film Fixer provided production support to the BBC Top Gear shoot in Burma (Myanmar)

Top Gear Special Burma: As Fixer – Much Joy! (with a little pain)

Parts 1 & 2 of the Top Gear Special Burma aired this past fortnight – and what a joy it was to finally see the end product. As the Fixer on the latest Top Gear Special, it was an amazing experience  – all of the hard work and many hours of footage, cut into a hilarious 2 part series – it was a real joy. But it does leave me wondering if I’ll be allowed back into Myanmar, with all the ‘horse-crop’ references throughout the show.

Top Gear Special Burma - Asia Film Fixers

The first appreciative – ‘skin-pinching’ moment was being introduced to the Top Gear family by Nick Springate, a senior world producer with the BBC. I was pretty chuffed, because if I was on Nick’s radar, I was obviously doing something ‘right’ in the region. Then to be asked by Alex Renton, the Top Gear series producer, to come on board, embed yourself in Myanmar for three months and take the lead on local support, government liaison, scouting, research, logistics and production support, was an utter buzz in itself.

Shooting the opening scene of Top Gear Special Burma on the Yangon parade ground in front of Shwedagon Pagoda

Shooting the opening scene of Top Gear Special Burma on the Yangon parade ground in front of Shwedagon Pagoda

But it is a double-edged sword – being offered this gig, you know exactly what spoils await, but to get there…phew….you know there will be blood, sweat and tears shed to make it all happen. And in a split second,  the initial doubt and pressures starts to set in, before you’ve even had a chance to utter the words ‘yes’.

My mind was racing – “I can’t believe the BIGGEST TV show in the world has asked me to help them!?” “Can I really do this?!?” and then the silence is broken by “yes, of course I can” (Still freaking out from the role you’ve just committed to) – From that moment on, the following 12 weeks were a complete blur…

Top Gear crew shooting a sequence in Yangon - narrow alleys and beer stations get in the way.

Top Gear crew shooting a sequence in Yangon – narrow alleys and beer stations get in the way. Photo by Terry Gordon

It was immediately evident to me, that Asia Film Fixers, was not going to be able to handle this job alone. The complexities of the Itinerary, the requirements for remote food/parcel drops – It was going to require an experienced local partner. I immediately engaged our travel and logistics partner at Khiri Travel www.khiri.com to assist Asia Film Fixers with the production support of the Top Gear Special. For the best part of 12 weeks, we jointly managed the requirements of the job, drafting letters of request from numerous government departments, attending dozens of meetings on behalf of the production, scouting locations and assisting with the purchase of those special ‘trucks’ – it was an amazing team effort on behalf of all at Asia Film Fixers and Khiri Travel.

Top Gear convoy rolls through another remote town in Myanmar. Photo Terry Gordon

Top Gear convoy rolls through another remote town in Myanmar. Photo Terry Gordon

Sam Wallaston, from the Guardian (UK) wrote: It must have been a vast – yes, almost military – operation: commandeering vehicles, fixers, setting up stunts, paying people off, clearing up, the spilt fruit, the bricks, the trees, the snapped overhead lines, the horses. But the result is, I’m afraid (I keep apologising, sorry), a very entertaining hour of television. Two hours in fact – there’s more next weekend and it looks equally fabulous, I’m afraid (again!). You can see his article here – http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2014/mar/10/top-gear-review-jeremy-clarkson

It was decided by the executive producers for the show,  that this year the presenters would drive trucks. “Great” I voiced, but deep down knowing that they would be a complete ‘pain in the rectum’. Trucks?!? – a form of transport that I know completely nothing about… Within a couple of hours of checking ‘used-truck’ prices in Yangon, I couldn’t believe how a forty year old truck, could retain so much of its value. The prices were ludicrous! It was quickly explained to me by Khiri Travel General Manager, Edwin Briels, that due to the trade embargoes placed on Myanmar decades earlier, that any type of vehicle was a huge capital investment, and as such, retained their value, not matter how many panels, fan-belts, gaskets and/or pistons had been replaced.

Our awesome local fixer and translator 'Mr Dicky' - he provided 24 hours support to the crew for 16 days straight!

Our awesome local fixer and translator ‘Mr Dicky’ – he provided 24 hours support to the crew for 16 days straight!

Additionally, one of the first tasks was to work out the route – how to get presenters from Yangon, into the Golden Triangle, and then off to the River Kwai – to build a bridge…and hopefully get over it.

There were numerous meetings, suggested routes, and the one we all felt was the most appealing and interesting, but also the most difficult to arrange, was a route that took the presenters and entourage through central and east Myanmar, directly through the Shan State – an area which has been in an intermittent civil war for decades. And a cease-fire had only been in place for less than two years – the perfect ingredients for an interesting location for the Top Gear team. Could we even get the permission from the Burmese government? How would the Shan state army react? Would we all end up as hostages? Would we get access at all?

Top Gear Special Burma Director Kit Lynch-Robinson on the starting 'grid' of the Naypyidaw drag race. 20 lane highway...not one car in sight!

Top Gear Special Burma Director Kit Lynch-Robinson on the starting ‘grid’ of the Naypyidaw drag race. 20 lane highway…not one car in sight!

During the scouting / recce stage of the Top Gear special planning – I had to travel with my local translator Dicky and photographer J.P. Klovstad, into the teak forested area of the Bago Plateau – we had to find a suitable road to travel from the western side of the plateau to the eastern side, an area of the Bago state where very few, if any, westerners had traveled before – this is the part of episode 1 where Jeremy, Richard and James have taken the wrong road. Clarkson “We’re on the wrong road, we are heading to Bangladesh!”. Over the preceding 10 weeks of the shoot, i traveled this area 3 times in search of suitable roads, overnight locations and river crossings. If anyone is wanting a ‘real’ raw and authentic journey in Myanmar, I thoroughly recommend this sidetrack.

Pyay to Taungoo - via the Bago Plateau

Pyay to Taungoo – via the Bago Plateau

The most amazing part of the Top Gear Special was getting the final approval to access to the Shan State – an area that has virtually been ‘cut-off’ from the rest of the world for decades. An area known for its fierce rivalry with the Burmese Army, and is also home of the ‘Golden Triangle’, It is an area of around 367,000 square miles (950,000 km2) that overlaps the mountains of three countries of Southeast Asia: Myanmar, Laos and Thailand. Along with Afghanistan in the Golden Crescent, it has been one of the most extensive opium-producing areas of Asia and of the world since the 1920s. Most of the world’s heroin came from the Golden Triangle until the early 21st century when Afghanistan became the world’s largest producer.

Asia Film Fixers' Terry Gordon and Burmese Police Officer on the 20 lane highway for the Naypyidaw Truck drag race - Top Gear Special Burma

Asia Film Fixers’ Terry Gordon and Burmese Police Officer on the 20 lane highway for the Naypyidaw Truck drag race – Top Gear Special Burma

Bragging rights – I can say that myself, Chris Hale (Top Gear Producer), Kit Lynch-Robinson (Director), Mr G (Security and spiritual advisor) and Bob Ives (Truck and vehicle specialist) were the first ‘ever’ foreigners to be allowed access and travel through the Shan State since the end of WWII! How were we the first? (I hear you ask – and state the fact that the presenters claimed to be the first) – Well in television, you need to know where you’re going – and also, once you get there, what’s going to be good T.V? The five of us were the advance party – the scouts! We recce’d the Shan State for a week, finding the best locations and ensuring that we could safely travel from one side to the other…. but please keep that one to yourself.

Terry Gordon – The Film Fixer

Terry Gordon
Terry Gordon - The Film Fixer

Born in Sydney, Australia, and growing up in Wellington, New Zealand, Terry learnt how to work with and manage the needs of TV and production crews when he was the public relations coordinator for the Royal Australian Air Force aerobatic team, ‘The Roulettes’. His fourteen years in the Air Force has given him a sound background in people and operations management.

Terry moved to Asia in 2005 and has spent the past 10 years organizing and leading small group journeys through Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, China and Japan. When not fixing, Terry takes contract work in remote places – In 2010 Terry spent 6 months in Kabul, Afghanistan as an Operations manager for Supreme Group, and most recently with the Exxon-Mobil LNG project in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

Terry is the founder of Asia Film Fixers, a film and tv production support consultancy currently operating in 10 SE Asian countries. Terry has experience managing the needs of small and large unit productions. Terry has worked with Channel Seven Australia’s Sunday Night; Roving Enterprises: Before the game and 7pm Project; Network Ten’s Good morning Australia , Sports Tonight and V8 Supercar productions; Channel Nine’s The AFL Footy Show and Wide World of Sport; The ABC’s ‘Sleek Geeks’ with Adam Spencer and Dr Karl, Cream Productions’ Wild Things with Dominic Monaghan & Modern Television’s (UK) journey to Burma with Griff Rhys Jones; as well as numerous documentary, film, television and sporting personalities – Australian film legend and hollywood star Jack Thompson, Australian Olympic swimmer and TV presenter Nicole Stevenson, Winter Olympic Gold Medalist Alisa Camplin, Formula 1 driver David Coulthard, AFL footballer Jason Akermanis, Supercar racing legends Greg Murphy and Jason Bargwanna, and Australian comedians Col Elliot, the late Lucky Grills, David Hughes and Julian Schiller. Most recently, Terry was the lead fixer for BBC Top Gear Special Myanmar (Burma).

Terry also has extensive experience managing travel and tour operations, specialising in unique and tailor-made itineraries throughout Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Myanmar.
Terry is currently the Director of Operations for Heritage Line, a boutique cruise company that offers luxury 5 star cruises in Vietnam, Cambodia and Myanmar.